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  • Writer's pictureNancy Schmidt

Feeling Stressed? Time to Take a Forest Bath

Updated: Jul 1, 2023

The busyness and stress of modern life can cause us to lose touch with our inner selves and what really matters. A forest provides a place where we can reflect, contemplate, and reconnect. When we take a walk in the woods, we surround ourselves with nature's beauty and tranquility. We step away from the noise and chaos of society and step into a world of simplicity and peace. When we do this for ourselves, we are able to listen to the whispers of our thoughts and tap into our intuition. So come along my friends -- it is time to destress and take a forest bath.



What is Forest Bathing?

Forest bathing, also known as Shinrin-yoku in Japanese, is a therapeutic practice that involves immersing ourselves in a forest or natural environment and mindfully engaging with our surroundings. It goes beyond simple observation and encourages us to use our senses to connect deeply with the sights, sounds, smells, and textures of the forest. This practice was first introduced in the 1980s in Japan and has since gained recognition worldwide for its ability to reduce stress, improve well-being, and foster a sense of harmony with nature.


Forest bathing is not just a visit or a temporary escape to nature. It is about recognizing our inherent connection to the natural world. It reminds us that nature is our home, and by immersing ourselves in its embrace, we return to a state of harmony and wholeness.


Forest bathing also fosters a sense of ecological awareness and appreciation for the natural world. As we immerse ourselves in the forest, we become attuned to the intricate web of life, recognizing our place within it. This understanding encourages us to become better stewards of the environment, to protect and preserve the beauty and resources that sustain us.



How to Do Forest Bathing:

  1. Choose the right forest: Find a forest or natural area that resonates with you. Look for places with diverse plant life, calming sounds of flowing water, and minimal people. National parks, nature reserves, or even local green spaces are perfect.

  2. Disconnect from technology: Prioritize being present in the moment by disconnecting from your electronic devices. Switch off your phone or put it on airplane mode to create an uninterrupted connection with nature.

  3. Slow down and be mindful: As you enter the forest, slow down your pace. Begin by taking a few deep breaths and consciously release any tension or worries. Engage your senses fully, focusing on the present moment. Observe the shapes, colors, and textures of the trees and plants around you. Listen to the rustling leaves, the songs of birds, and the sounds of running water. Feel the coolness of the air, the texture of the bark, or the softness of fallen leaves under your feet. You may even want to walk barefoot.

  4. Engage your senses: Deliberately engage each of your senses to deepen your connection with the forest. Notice the aroma of the trees and flowers, the sweetness in the air, or the earthy scent of the forest floor. Feel the gentle breeze on your skin, the warmth of the sunlight filtering through the trees, or the coolness of a nearby stream. Allow yourself to truly taste the experience of being in nature, opening yourself to the wonders it offers.

  5. Mindful walking and exploration: Begin your walk with a gentle and mindful pace. Let go of any goals or destinations and allow your intuition to guide you. Follow your curiosity as you explore different paths or areas of the forest. Take breaks to sit or lean against a tree, embracing its grounding energy. Find a comfortable spot to sit and simply be. Soak in the tranquility of your surroundings.

  6. Reflect and journal: After your forest bathing experience, reflect on your observations and feelings. Consider journaling about your experiences, insights, or any emotions that arose during the practice. Writing down your thoughts can help deepen your connection with yourself and create a record of your journey.

What if you aren't able to head to a nearby forest or park? Try taking a Virtual Forest Bath. Virtual forest bathing is a good way to easily and quickly access the soothing power of the natural world when you cannot take a walk in it. This can be a supportive practice especially when paired with sounds of the forest. I invite you to click on the video below to enjoy a 2 minute practice together.




Forest bathing is a practice that invites us to slow down, connect with nature, and find inner peace. By immersing ourselves in the healing embrace of the forest, we can rejuvenate our minds, reduce stress, and restore our sense of well-being. Remember, forest bathing is not a one-time activity but a practice that can be integrated into our lives regularly.


So, next time you feel stressed and need to reset, let yourself get sidetracked by nature and take a bath in the woods.



"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks." –John Muir.


Have an inspired day my friends - Namaste,

Nancy

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